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September 2020

Tuesday, 29 September 2020 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Monday, 28 September 2020 00:00

The Plantar Fascia and Heel Pain

Patients who have heel pain often notice that it can gradually get worse. It may become severe in the morning after arising, and an abnormal walking style may develop. Research has indicated that the majority of heel pain comes from an inflamed plantar fascia. The plantar fascia is a band of tissue that is found on the bottom of the foot, and connects the heel to the toes. It can become torn or damaged from wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or if an injury has occurred. It can be common among patients who enjoy running or those who participate in certain sporting activities. Mild relief can be felt if additional weight is lost, as this may help to eliminate excess pressure on the heels. If you are experiencing any type of heel pain, it is strongly recommended that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose your condition and guide you toward the correct treatment options.

Many people suffer from bouts of heel pain. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Causes of Heel Pain

Heel pain is often associated with plantar fasciitis. The plantar fascia is a band of tissues that extends along the bottom of the foot. A rip or tear in this ligament can cause inflammation of the tissue.

Achilles tendonitis is another cause of heel pain. Inflammation of the Achilles tendon will cause pain from fractures and muscle tearing. Lack of flexibility is also another symptom.

Heel spurs are another cause of pain. When the tissues of the plantar fascia undergo a great deal of stress, it can lead to ligament separation from the heel bone, causing heel spurs.

Why Might Heel Pain Occur?

  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes                  
  • Wearing non-supportive shoes
  • Weight change           
  • Excessive running

Treatments

Heel pain should be treated as soon as possible for immediate results. Keeping your feet in a stress-free environment will help. If you suffer from Achilles tendonitis or plantar fasciitis, applying ice will reduce the swelling. Stretching before an exercise like running will help the muscles. Using all these tips will help make heel pain a condition of the past.

If you have any questions please contact one of our offices located in East Brunswick, and Monroe Township, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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Tuesday, 22 September 2020 00:00

Wounds on the Feet may Heal Slowly

Foot ulcers can be a common occurrence in diabetic patients. This type of wound generally heals slowly, which may be a result of elevated blood glucose levels, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia. Proper wound care and management can consist of eliminating existing pressure from shoes that are worn. Some patients find it helpful to wear special footwear or therapeutic boots. Keeping the wound clean is beneficial in accelerating the healing process, and it may help to moisturize the surrounding area. Improving circulation is also said to promote faster healing as well as diminish pain. If you have wounds on your feet, it is advised that you speak to a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can recommend the appropriate treatment methods and help prevent infection.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with one of our podiatrists from University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in East Brunswick, and Monroe Township, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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A symptom that is often associated with the medical condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma is a numbing and tingling sensation between the third and fourth toes. It can develop as a result of stress and irritation of the surrounding nerves, and may cause swelling. Research has indicated that women are mostly affected by this condition, and it may come from wearing high heels that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. Mild relief may be found when orthotics are worn inside the shoe, as this may help to protect the affected nerve. Additionally, larger shoes may have to be purchased which may bring mild relief. If you have pain in this part of your foot, please consult with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Morton’s neuroma.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in East Brunswick, and Monroe Township, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 08 September 2020 00:00

Risk Factors for Achilles Tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is an injury of the Achilles tendon, the thick tendon located in the back of the leg that allows you to push off while walking, running, or jumping. While anybody can sustain this injury, some people are more at risk than others. Athletes are especially prone to Achilles tendon injuries because they frequently engage in physical activity that can strain the tendon. Athletes who suddenly increase the intensity of their workouts, or change their playing surface or footwear, are at an increased risk of hurting their Achilles tendon. Tight or weak calf muscles, an excessively inward-rolling gait, chronic ankle instability, and differences in the length of your legs can also contribute to tendon injuries. Another common cause of Achilles tendonitis is wearing high heels frequently, which can shorten the Achilles tendon making it more prone to injury. Older age, flat feet, and certain types of arthritis can increase the risk of Achilles tendonitis as well. If you have experienced an Achilles tendon injury, it is recommended that you visit a podiatrist for treatment as soon as possible.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in East Brunswick, and Monroe Township, NJ. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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