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June 2023

Tuesday, 27 June 2023 00:00

Everything You Need to Know About Corns

Corns are hard and thick areas of skin that form as a result of constant rubbing, friction, or pressure on the skin. They are patches of dead skin with a small plug toward the center. They may appear on the tops and sides of toes and can make walking painful.

Soft corns are typically thinner with a white color and rubbery texture. Soft corns tend to appear between the toes. Seed corns are another type of corn that appear in clusters and can be tender if they are on a weight-bearing part of the foot. Seed corns usually appear on the bottom of the foot and are likely caused by a blockage in sweat ducts.

While corns and calluses are somewhat similar, calluses are a bit different. Calluses are a patch of dead skin that can occur anywhere on the body. In comparison to corns, calluses are usually a bit larger in size. However, both corns and calluses are caused by increased friction on the skin.

There are some risk factors that may increase your chances of developing corns and calluses. If you have bunions, hammertoe, or a bone spur, you are more likely to develop a corn or callus on your foot.

While Corns and Calluses tend to disappear when the friction to the affected area ceases, the help of a podiatrist may be useful in the removal process. It is important to remove the dead skin around the area and this may be done in a few different ways. Moisturizing creams may be helpful in softening and removing the dead skin around the callus. You should never use razors or other pedicure equipment to remove your corns. Doing this may worsen your corn or callus and cause infection. 

In some cases, corns and calluses may be caused by abnormal foot structure or walking motion. In such a case, you should seek a podiatrist’s assistance in order to correct the issue.

Tuesday, 27 June 2023 00:00

What to Do About Corns on the Feet

Having a corn on the foot can become quite painful, but luckily is easy to prevent. A foot corn is a thickening of the skin on the toes or on the bottom of the foot. It is usually the result of excessive pressure on the skin, often caused by improperly fitting shoes. While a corn itself is not painful, when it rubs against a nerve or bone in the toe or foot, it can become irritated and inflamed. Besides wearing shoes that are too tight, other causes of corns are seams in the shoes, hammertoes, bunions, and gait abnormalities. The most effective way to prevent corns is to change the type of footwear you buy. Once a corn has developed, finding ways to ease the pressure while wearing shoes is paramount. Shoes with ample room for the toes to move in and wearing corn pads can be effective in accomplishing this. Patients who have foot deformities may wish to investigate the benefits of having custom orthotics made that may help to prevent the ongoing formation of corns. For more information on managing corns on the feet, it is suggested that you visit a podiatrist.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Genine Befumo, DPM of University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Monroe Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Everything You Need to Know About Corns

One out of ten broken bones is reported to be in the feet. When an object crushes, bends, or stretches the bone beyond acceptable ranges, bones break. A break in the foot is either a fracture or a straight break.

The location of any break can tell you how the break happened. Toes, for instance, break typically as a result of something being kicked hard and with great force. Heel breaks almost always are a result of an improper landing from a tall height. Twists or sprains are the other two frequent occurrences. As with all usual breaks, they result from unexpected accident or sudden injury. As with stress fractures, breaks form as a process over time from repeated stress on already present cracks. Runners, dancers, and gymnasts are the usual athletes who receive this type of break. Stress fractures result from incredible pressure on the feet. It is no surprise these athletes bear the majority of reported fractures.

Pain, swelling, bruising, and redness are all indicative of the typical symptoms from a broken foot. Severe pain—to the point of not being able to walk—usually depends on the location of the break in the foot. Toes are on the lower scale of pain threshold, but heels are high, as are a few other particular bones. As the severity of the broken foot increases, symptoms like blueness, numbness, misshaping of the foot, cuts, or deformities will become apparent. These symptoms indicate the need to see a medical professional with access to an x-ray facility.

Prior to seeing a specialist, precautions should be taken to reduce pain and swelling. Elevate and stabilize the foot, and refrain from moving it. Immobilization of the foot is the next priority, so creating a homemade splint is acceptable. Keep in mind that while creating a splint, any increase of pain or cutting off blood circulation means that the splint should be removed immediately. Use ice to decrease swelling and relieve pain symptoms.

When dealing with a medical center, the patient should note that the treatment can vary. The treatment will depend on the severity of the fracture and the cause of the break. Crutches, splits, or casts are common treatments while surgery has been known to be used in more severe cases in order to repair the break in the bones. 

Tuesday, 20 June 2023 00:00

Causes of a Broken Foot

A broken foot is painful. It generally happens suddenly from falling and is considered a common type of injury. Bruising, severe pain, and swelling often accompany a broken foot, and the range of motion can be limited. Walking is difficult, if not impossible, and prompt medical attention is typically sought for relief. Dropping a heavy object on the foot is also a common cause of a broken foot, and the severity of the break may depend on the angle the object was dropped from. People who frequently participate in sporting activities may endure a broken foot, and soccer players may be prone to incurring this type of fracture from kicking the ball. A diagnosis consisting of having an X-ray taken can be performed, followed by beginning the correct treatment. Most people who have broken footwear have a cast or protective boot until it has healed, which can take several weeks. If you have broken your foot, it is suggested that you speak with a podiatrist who can correctly diagnose and treat this condition.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Genine Befumo, DPM from University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Monroe Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Friday, 16 June 2023 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Tuesday, 13 June 2023 00:00

Wound Care

Diabetics must be wary of all wounds, regardless of depth or size. Diabetes, a chronic disease in which the body cannot properly use glucose the way it normally would, causes various complications that make wounds difficult to heal. Nerve damage or neuropathy will cause diabetics to have trouble feeling the pain of a blister or cut until the condition has significantly worsened or become infected. A diabetic’s weakened immune system can make even the most minor of wounds easily susceptible to infection. Diabetics are also more prone to developing narrow, clogged arteries, and are therefore more likely to develop wounds.

Wounds should be taken care of immediately after discovery, as even the smallest of wounds can become infected if enough bacteria build up within the wound.  To remove dirt, wounds should be first rinsed under running water only. Soap, hydrogen peroxide, or iodine can irritate the injury and should be avoided. To prevent infection, apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover it with a bandage. The bandage should be changed daily. The skin around the wound may be cleaned with soap.

To prevent further exacerbation, see a doctor—especially if you have diabetes. Minor skin conditions can become larger problems if not properly inspected. As the wound heals, make sure to avoid applying pressure to the affected area.

Tuesday, 13 June 2023 00:00

Foot Wounds and Diabetes

Complications from foot wounds can be serious in patients who have diabetes. When blood sugar levels are too high, the blood vessels can narrow and arteries can stiffen. This blocks blood flow, oxygen, and important nutrients needed to help heal wounds. Wounds can become infected and the compromised immune system in diabetics may not be able to fight it. This type of infection can spread to soft tissue, bone, and blood, which could lead to sepsis. Neuropathy is common among diabetics which is a condition that damages the nerves in the legs and feet. Neuropathy may lead to a loss of sensation, making it difficult to feel foot problems arising. Neuropathy can also make it difficult to walk and increased pressure can be put on certain parts of the feet to help diabetics sense the floor. This pressure can cause skin to break down and ulcers to form. Closely monitoring blood sugar levels and wearing protective and well-fitting shoes may help diabetic patients in preventing abrasions from developing on their feet. If you have diabetes, it is strongly suggested that you include a podiatrist on your healthcare team. This medical professional can routinely examine your feet and help you keep on top of any issues that might emerge.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Genine Befumo, DPM from University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Monroe Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Tuesday, 06 June 2023 00:00

Foot Pain

The feet, being the foundation of the body, carry all of the body’s weight and are therefore prone to experiencing pain and discomfort. If you are experiencing foot pain, it is important to determine where in the foot you are experiencing this pain to help discover the cause of it. While pain can be experienced virtually anywhere in the foot, the most common sites of foot pain are in the heel and ankle.   

Heel pain can be due to a multitude of conditions including plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and heel spurs. Pain experienced in the ankle can be a sign of an ankle sprain, arthritis, gout, ankle instability, ankle fracture, or nerve compression. In more serious cases, pain in the foot can be a sign of improper alignment or an infection.

Foot pain can be accompanied by symptoms including redness, swelling, stiffness and warmth in the affected area. Whether the pain can be described as sharp or dull depends on the foot condition behind it. It is important to visit your local podiatrist if your foot pain and its accompanying symptoms persist and do not improve over time.

Depending on the location and condition of your foot pain, your podiatrist may prescribe certain treatments. These treatments can include but are not limited to prescription or over-the-counter drugs and medications, certain therapies, cortisone injections, or surgery.

If you are experiencing persistent foot pain, it is important to consult with your foot and ankle doctor to determine the cause and location. He or she will then prescribe the best treatment for you. While milder cases of foot pain may respond well to rest and at-home treatments, more serious cases may take some time to fully recover.

Tuesday, 06 June 2023 00:00

Ganglion Cysts on the Feet

A ganglion cyst on the foot develops near joints or tendons, of which there are many in the foot. It is like a soft pebble filled with a gel-like fluid and is noncancerous. In many cases, a ganglion cyst will disappear or gradually diminish in size, despite the fact it can be quite painful and tender to the touch. Symptoms of a ganglion cyst are a noticeable lump, a tingling or burning pain if it touches a nerve, and irritation that can happen while wearing shoes. A ganglion cyst forms when synovial fluid leaks from a joint or tendon and collects in a sac under the skin. If it is particularly painful and interferes with the completion of your daily activities, a podiatrist can drain the cyst of its fluid and inject it with medication. It is very dangerous to try to pop a ganglion cyst yourself, as this may cause further damage and increase the risk of infection. In severe cases, surgery can be an option. For help with a ganglion cyst on the foot, it is suggested that you make an appointment with a podiatrist who can determine the best options to treat a ganglion cyst. 

Foot Pain

Foot pain can be extremely painful and debilitating. If you have a foot pain, consult with Genine Befumo, DPM from University Foot and Ankle Center, L.L.C. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Causes

Foot pain is a very broad condition that could be caused by one or more ailments. The most common include:

  • Bunions
  • Hammertoes
  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Bone Spurs
  • Corns
  • Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Ingrown Toenails
  • Arthritis (such as Gout, Rheumatoid, and Osteoarthritis)
  • Flat Feet
  • Injury (from stress fractures, broken toe, foot, ankle, Achilles tendon ruptures, and sprains)
  • And more

Diagnosis

To figure out the cause of foot pain, podiatrists utilize several different methods. This can range from simple visual inspections and sensation tests to X-rays and MRI scans. Prior medical history, family medical history, and any recent physical traumatic events will all be taken into consideration for a proper diagnosis.

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the cause of the foot pain. Whether it is resting, staying off the foot, or having surgery; podiatrists have a number of treatment options available for foot pain.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Monroe Township, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Foot Pain
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